Publishers

Blog posts for publishers

Publishers: here’s the best thing you can adopt this festive season

Publishers: here’s the best thing you can adopt this festive season

A kitten? No. And it’s not a puppy either (although, that would be nice). The best thing you can adopt this year is Ads.txt. Unfortunately, it’s not as fluffy as a kitten and it won’t go for walkies. But, it can soon become a man’s (or woman’s) best friend.

This year, P&G’s Marc Pritchard called the digital advertising industry out on it’s lack of transparency, claiming it’s “murky at best, and fraudulent at worst”. But the IAB (the Internet Advertising Bureau) have developed a tool (released in May earlier this year) to help clear the murky waters.

What is Ads.txt?

It’s an IAB-approved tool that can be used to authenticate websites and prevent unauthorised inventory sales.

Why should you care?

This tool removes fraud from the sell side by preventing domain spoofing.

Domain spoofing is when a site is made to resemble a real and established website. This practice allows publishers to misrepresent low quality inventory as coming from high quality sources.

The Financial Times recently investigated domain spoofing against their site and found shockingly high levels: “They estimated the value of the fraudulent inventory to be £1 million a month.” However, this won’t affect their revenue anymore as they’ve recently started using Ads.txt and their inventory can be authorised by buyers.

Also, as you’re probably more than aware, we’re on the cusp of the busiest time of year, so there’s no better time than now to get friendly with Ads.txt.

What are the advantages?

  • Ads.txt is free to use (and who doesn’t love a freebie?)

  • This is a step further towards a fraud free web

  • Increases transparency in the whole industry

  • Opens up communication between all companies along the chain

  • Publishers: maintain your revenue

  • Advertisers: know exactly what inventory you’re buying

What are the disadvantages?

Apart from taking a small amount of time to set up…none!

Great! So how can you adopt Ads.txt?

You need to add an Ads.txt file to your site by adding “/ads.txt” on your root domain. It’s essentially adding an extra page on your website.

For example:

http://example.org/ads.txt

This page will contain the information that the ads.txt crawler will use to verify authentication.

This set of data is a list of advertising systems, such as DSPs, Exchanges etc. that are allowed to buy inventory on that site. This will include their domain names, a unique publisher account number and the type of account (direct/reseller).

For example:

coull.com, 12345, DIRECT #banner

google.com, 23456, DIRECT #banner

appnexus.com, 34567, RESELLER #native

Why do we love Ads.txt at Coull?

Ads.txt fits in with our company ad fraud ethos:

Coull's ethos.png

We think that implementing Ads.txt throughout the whole industry will bring more transparency and teamwork and will help fight the battle against those nasty fraudsters.

So, what’s next?

The IAB are looking to make Ads.txt mandatory soon, so the earlier you can implement it, the better. Companies all along the chain are already saying they only want to work with Ads.txt publishers. Don’t lose out on your revenue for something that is free and so simple.

For more information on Ads.txt, visit the IAB Tech Lab.

Posted by Naomi Sandercock in Coull comment
A digital fad or valuable ads?

A digital fad or valuable ads?

Ten-second selfies took the world by storm five years ago, in the form of Snapchat. Millennials flocked to the app like bees to a hive, and now, 166 million users send snaps daily.

Amongst features such as ‘Filters’, ‘Stories’ and ‘Discover’, a new addition arrived last month: the ‘Snap Map’. This enables Snapchatters to see their friends locations and popular local stories all over the globe. As you can imagine, this feature didn’t come without controversy.

But the point is, Snapchat is feeling the pressure to innovate. Although the app’s popularity has had steady growth over the years, one social media platform has been stealing the limelight: Instagram.

Instagram haven’t hidden the fact that they’ve replicated many of Snapchat’s features, such as ‘stories’. They tapped into the care-free approach of Snapchat, allowing quick sharing without leaving a footprint. Originally, Instagram started out by offering users a way of posting well though-out and edited posts. But now, Instagram has both options and as a result, the appeal of the app has skyrocketed.

How can Snapchat win back users?

  • Make it easier for people to find brands on Snapchat

Discovering a brand on Snapchat is difficult because the exact username is needed to add someone. Brands are struggling to see the benefits of using Snapchat and are either changing their tactics or switching to a different platform altogether. If Snapchat is able to change this, it’s likely that many brands would return and the users would follow.

  • Focus on creativity and functionality

Snapchat’s main message at Cannes this year was, “Bigger isn’t better” (Although their huge Ferris Wheel conveyed a slightly different message). They’re clearly aware of their growth levelling out and are putting the focus on the app’s creativity and functionality. This makes sense because, no matter how exciting an app’s features are, the duplication of these concepts will inevitably appear on competing platforms.

If Snapchat can concentrate on keeping their users happy with fun new technology and simple functionality of the app, users are more likely to stay loyal.

  • Involve influencers more

Multiple influencers are finding it harder and harder to get the support they need from SnapchatSallia Goldstein has a large Snapchat following but was recently forced to make the move to Instagram due to technical issues on Android. She told Buzzfeed, “It’s not because I want to move everything over to Instagram. It’s because I have to.”

Also, a Snapchat executive reportedly told another influencerSarah Peretz, “Snapchat is an app for friends, not creators.” when she told them she was leaving the platform.

By limiting their app this way, they’ll lose both influencers and their audiences. Some dedicated support to influencers could change all of that.

  • More monetising options

Publishers prefer Instagram because they present more monetising options. For example, Instagram allows creators to link to external sites. And the increased length of videos have enticed many publishers.

Whereas, at the moment, Snapchat’s ‘Discover’ page is one of the only places to advertise — and the access to this is limited.

Snapchat is in a very powerful position, if they can appeal to advertisers and publishers on a larger scale, it could put them ahead of the game.

Coming back to the Snap Map, this could become a valuable opportunity for brands. It could potentially offer location based mobile advertising, leading to a more targeted reach and increased engagement. This could be the way to surpass the social media war and could provide some healthy competition against the Google/Facebook duopoly in the mobile advertising world.

Changes on the horizon?

Snapchat are on the look out for ad tech companies in an attempt to increase the efficiency of their ads and in turn, appeal to more marketers. There have been acquisition talks with AdRoll, the programmatic advertising platform, but no offers have been taken up yet.

Only time will tell if Snapchat will survive the social platform wars or merely become just another digital fad.


At Coull, we recognise the value of video content on the web and see the importance of keeping fun and exciting content accessible. We provide technology to monetise videos that effectively tell a brand’s message and keep content creators happy. Want to know more about what we do? Talk to one of our team.

Posted by Naomi Sandercock in Coull comment

The importance of targeting

Targeting in your platform is usually a fairly simple operation – it’s easy to setup and you expect it to work based on the rules you implemented. However…

  • How many of you audit your targeting – do your publishers send you the correct information?

  • How many of you are speaking to your demand side to ensure that your targeting is matching their targeting?

  • Are you seeing misaligned CPM’s and wondering why?

The chances are that your targeting rules are misaligned. Most of the tags that we send out are price matched against either domain lists, player sizes and/or geos. I personally do not see much misalignment against domain lists or geos, but I do when it comes to player sizes. The publisher is expected to send a certain size via a particular tag. And due to the strict targeting we apply on our demand side, you’re probably losing revenue and decreasing your fill rate.

Audit

Recently,  I completed an internal audit across our supply chain – I wanted to know the amount of requests we received, where we were unable to detect/receive the following:

  • page_url

  • player_width

  • player_height

In a 24-hour period we received 180k requests where we were unable to pass required information to our exchange. It’s a small percentage of our overall traffic, but add that to misaligned pricing channels and it starts to add up – especially when you sit in a chain of other ad servers.

At Coull, we’re happy to audit your traffic and let you know where sales are going amiss. Equally, we have another amazing option – it’s called multi-price floor targeting. We are not the first to use it. But it does make sense!

We only need to supply you with one tag:

  • Tell us what CPMs you expect and we’ll handle all the necessary targeting.

  • Use subID’s only to identify sub-publishers rather than price points.

  • We will never undersell your inventory.

  • All targeting criteria is immediately lined up with our demand stack, ensuring the best connections.

We care about the quality of our traffic and continue to develop technologies and communications that improve the transparency of inventory. If you would like your traffic to be audited, please reach out to your account manager. We are more than happy to help!

Posted by simonholliday in Coull comment

RTB 2.5 – new features that affect video advertising

DPS2-880x495.jpg

With the release of the draft spec for RTB 2.5 there are some super interesting new ideas around how to describe video adverts. Here we’ll take you through a few and how we see them being used.

1 video.placement

This addition allows publishers and SSPs to describe the type of placement that an ad is being requested for. We’ve all seen 300×250 ad placements come through, and we all know they are in banner requests – now we have a way of saying that explicitly.

2 Data Encoding

You can now specify a data encoding header that should be handled by the bidder. A good example of this would be specifying gzip encoding of the bid request – this simply compresses the traffic over the wire from exchange to bidder and back, saving on bandwidth and ultimately money.

3 Bid Changes

There are a few changes to the bid object. A bidder now has the ability to provide a Billing Notice URL (burl) and a Loss Notice URL (lurl).

For Coull, this added layer of transparency is something we’ve been passing to bidders for a while now, albeit relying on our own tech to make that possible. It’s an important inclusion as 2017 will be the year brands and agencies demand more clarity about what they’re bidding on and the result of the auction in real time. We allow the bidder to see if they’ve won or lost, and what the winning price was, which only helps optimise the whole process.

The addition of these 2 features introduces a subtle but important change to the data a DSP can get from an auction. The win notification can now be thought of as just that – the price you offered was enough to win the auction but it doesn’t guarantee anything.

The burl is a great addition, as it’s stage further on from the current win notification. The burl will provide a more accurate way of tracking spend based on delivered impressions, as it’s connected to the impression – it’s saying this impression cost $x.  Splitting these 2 things up enables DSPs to track things like failed impressions and possibly partners that may have issues with their player.

The loss notification adds another dimension to this information. It enables the DSP to immediately know that the spend that they had assigned to the auction is now free – there will be no impression. Coull has been offering loss notifications since the introduction of its Exchange and we’re pleased to see this finally make it into the RTB specification

4 Source

The new Source object lets the exchange pass on some data about whether or not there will be a decision made upstream from the exchange. Header Bidding is the obvious example here, but more and more Ad Managers are holding client side auctions to increase the amount of demand an opportunity sees, and it’s normal now to see sideways connections from exchange to exchange, again to increase the amount of demand available in an efficient way.

There are some more changes, little and big, to the spec but I’ll leave it there for now. The above represents what we believe to be the most interesting ideas in the new spec. It’s great to see some positive changes have been made in the is latest update, and again we’ll look for yet for improvements come version 2.6.

Posted by simonholliday in Coull comment

The Coull ad request journey – Whatsapp style

An ad request really is like a group discussion with everyone bringing something to the table. Our Invalid Traffic Detection looks pretty straight forward but is actually made up of multiple fraud detection vendors as well as our in-house compliance team. And our QUASAR tech has some amazing layers to it that help us ensure the best inventory and brand match. The right conversation means we get the best possible performance every time.

We hope this helps to clarify the ad request process and get some more conversations going.

Posted by simonholliday in Coull comment

Coull Quickie October – The one about ad fraud

 We’ve spoken about ad fraud before, it’s making headlines, lots of platforms and vendors are saying they’re doing something about it, but the proof is not in expensive marketing campaigns claiming miracles, it’s in the investment by tech companies to make a real change to the way digital media is bought.

Let’s break this down, discard the sugar coating and get real.

Posted by simonholliday in Coull video

Stop forcing your ad agency to buy fraud

Agencies and marketers are taking the reins of their ad spending and campaign monitoring, but there is still a lot of confusion over what KPIs best capture how well a digital campaign has performed.

But does it really matter?

The short answer, yes.

Marketers’ choice of KPI’s can actually be having a massive impact on the overall success of a digital campaign.

Often the metrics and benchmarks marketers set can indirectly encourage ad buyers to turn to fraudulent options as a means of hitting unrealistic targets. Marketers and Advertisers soon find themselves trapped in the number-chasing cycle.

So, how can we break the cycle?

Mastering the Metrics: Viewability

Marketers and Advertisers need to understand ad metrics and read between the numbers. As Digiday reports, GroupM doesn’t care about the time spent on an ad, but rather whether an ad is 100% in view. Metrics such as viewability rate, fill rate and impression rate can offer detailed information on this, but aiming for an unrealistically high % can pose an array of risks:

  • Pushing for a large amount of impressions may compromise the ad’s placement online.

  • Ad buyers may turn to ad servers and/or players that partake in malpractice such as:

    • counting an impression before the ad has loaded

    • rotating multiple ads in a player to count multiple impressions with no ad being properly served

    • placing an ad on a range of fraudulent websites.

  • Ad buyers may be encouraged to ‘cookie bomb’ a page, by dropping lots of cookies onto a page with the idea that at least a small percentage will convert.

  • Highly viewable traffic is not always highly viewed by humans. Unusually high viewability rates can be an indicator of high fraudulent activity.

Transparent Reporting

Marketers, advertisers & publishers need access to impartial campaign performance  measurement.

Here at Coull we recognise the industry’s need for a third party fraud-free “enforcer”. By using an array of fraud detection tools, such as Forensic, the IAB’s approved cybersecurity service and manual vetting, we are able detect the most sophisticated patterns of fraudulent behaviour & work closely with both the publishers and advertisers to relay this information back and (most importantly) take action across our marketplace.

The duopoly, Google and Facebook, have often been accused of having a much less objective approach to reports due to the fact that some of their ad metrics have yet to be verified by third-parties. The UK Business Insider has likened this to “marking their own homework”.

Realistic Targets

Marketers & Advertisers need to be realistic with their KPI benchmarks. As Venture Beat reports, new video formats such as click-to-play pre-roll, native and out-stream, and video within social content are much more fraud-resistant. However, “ad-buyers continued to expect the high  completion rates the overall industry had been promising”.

       

Many have suggested that the need for a new reporting metric is the real answer to the dilemma. But the reality is, numbers will always be subject to potential manipulation. The responsibility lies with the marketers to tackle digital ad metrics head on, without turning a blind eye to the potential risks. Numbers on fill, viewability and completion on high quality fraud free websites are undoubtedly going to be lower than those generated in the realm of bots, dodgy players and fake websites.

Ultimately, elevated completion rates like those projected by both Facebook and Google in recent months are simply unrealistic for in-feed ads. Both marketers and advertisers need to agree that a potential dip in the graph is a small price to pay for real human views on high quality sites.

Posted by simonholliday in Coull comment
Tackling video ad fraud

Tackling video ad fraud

Digital advertising has had its fair share of issues over the years, some of which have been overcome, some of which remain bugbears and some of which are critically problematic in our industry today.  Ad fraud is without a doubt the latter. In 2015 we saw the rise of bots and in 2016 the advertising industry is set to attribute losses of approximately $7.2 billion globally to the nasty things.

Ad fraud covers a range of cunning practices and deceitful techniques administered by fraudsters with the object of making money. One of the reasons ad fraud is the plague of programmatic advertising is that it can appear in so many forms, making it difficult for a lot of the industry to identify, let alone deal with. Here are some of the types of desktop fraud we come across at Coull:

  • Automated traffic Finds botnet activity flagged on the user level through real-time traffic pattern analysis.
  • ProxyThe IP address is a known proxy.
  • SpoofingThe user’s device and browser were manipulated to resemble a different device or browser. This technique is commonly used to produce a real – life distribution of traffic and simulate traffic from multiple visitors.
  • Ad injection – The ad was locked by ad injection software, often bundled with other software like games and toolbars. This practice artificially inflates the number of ads on a page and can lead to negative user experience.
  • Cloaked domains – There is an imbalance between the domain where the ad appeared and the referring domain. This practice enables undesirable properties such as pirate and adult portals to sell inventory under a high-CPM category such as cars or travel.
  • Domain spoofing – The publisher reports an inaccurate domain to the exchange. The ad never appeared on the publisher- reported domain. This practice allows publishers to misrepresent low-quality inventory as coming from high quality sources. In some cases, ghost sites can use this technique.

What are bots?

Unfortunately, I’m not talking about R2-D2, the bots I am referring to represent non-human traffic, the most common form of ad fraud today. Fraud exists to make money illegally and as digital advertising grows, fraudsters are able to take advantage of the system. Bots can come from software applications which run automated tasks over the internet to simulate human activity. It has been estimated that 8%-23% of online video ad inventory is consumed by bot impressions which makes this a significant problem for video advertisers to contend with. (Videology)

Solution?

At Coull we utilise industry leading cyber- security services to filter and detect inappropriate content coming through the system. Our Compliance team use strategies to identify and rate any invalid traffic.  This enables us to have a multi-level process targeting ad fraud and eliminating it from our platform, manual detection being a key part in removing certain types of domain fraud, including the aforementioned ghost sites, that haunt the web.

Who you gonna call?…

So what are they ‘ghost’ sites you say? Well, they’re spooks! Ghost sites may look like ordinary web sites at first glance, however if you dig a little deeper you will uncover their dark secrets. These sinister pages exist to bypass tech filters and because they look clean and safe, tech vendors let them off the hook.

We are doing everything we can to identify ghost sites and ensure the culprits don’t get past our compliance, but there are things you can do to, and they don’t involve bringing in an exorcist. Follow the simple tips below and you will be able to spot a ghost site a mile away.

How to spot a ghost (site)

  • WordPress templates

Ghost sites typically look very similar as their templates often originate from WordPress. The templates will all have the same layout with different skins for each.

  • No contact information/web hosting information

Ghost sites more often than not have links to social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest however if you click on the link they will lead to nothing or non-updated accounts. If the Facebook page has thousands of likes, it’s legitimate. Something else to look out for is that they use cheap website solutions such as ‘Garden Pages’ and will hide their presence on the internet with services like DomainsByProxy. Want to try and contact the owner? No chance as they won’t have any contact information or the information will be false.

  • Strange growth patterns

Ghost sites do not pay for their traffic growth and will buy from Click Farms.

  • Hardcoded banner ads

Banner ads on a ghost site will have a URL destination which will lead straight back to the same Ghost site. The banner ads are mostly static images making them seem like genuine advertisement however they are most probably fake.

The future

Ad fraud detection and eradication is very tricky business. Every day is like living in the Wild West with fraudsters running wild and stealing impressions left, right and centre. There is no square jawed superhero to lock them up and put an end to their tyranny but we’re working hard to change that.

Our compliance team is leading the way, stepping up to guard our marketplace from fraudulent activity. Coull has a zero tolerance policy, taking all forms of ad fraud very seriously. We are raising awareness and working with leading fraud detection vendors because we want to make the industry a fraud free place for our partners. We can weed the industry garden of fraud, we just ask for your help replanting it.

Posted by simonholliday in Coull comment

ODV spells good news for publishers

The IAB last month released the Original Digital Video Consumer Study based around US audience’s TV viewing, compared with original digital video viewing habits. The results aren’t particularly surprising but they do paint an interesting picture of where media consumption is headed and it’s something publishers need to take heed of in regard to how their content is presented. For advertisers, it’s just as poignant in defining where their spend should be directed and for traditional TV media owners it’s about being aware of the facts and adapting.

Before we dive in and look at the changing behaviour in US media viewing habits, let’s first clarify ODV.

What is Original Digital Video – ODV?  

Essentially it is originally produced online video which can further be defined as professionally produced video only for ad-supported online distribution and viewing (not TV).

Who creates ODV?

Typically, ODV is created by a range of professional media companies such as Wall Street Journal Live News, Glamor DO’s and Don’ts, purely online media such as YouTube Original Channels and PewDiePie.

What other digital content owners are competing for audience attention?

  • TV Online is made up of Network TV shows like Pretty LIttle Liars and The Walking Dead or sites on the ABC.com and HBO.com
  • Amatuer Online Video is just that, video created by regular people, home made videos generally and short form more often than not.

The IAB outlined some of its key takeaways which included:

1) Growth of the original digital video market continues

The year over year growth continues for ODV unlike TV online and amateur video – which are flat in terms of growth.

2) Original digital video beats regular TV among viewers

Unique content that can be watched anywhere within anyone’s schedule, is a leading factor in the viewing choices of US adults .

3) Original digital video is becoming more ingrained

ODV’s improved quality and accessibility makes it more and more of a habitual exercise, meaning not only are more people switching to ODV, but they are watching more of it than they were before.

4) Social media wildfire

ODV is shareable, it’s engaging and often leads to another view or engagement with more content from the same site.

If growth is the name of the game – ODV has all the winning moves

The story of ODV is one of growth with approximately 63 million US adults viewing ODV on a monthly basis.

Whist TV online and Amateur video have healthy, respectable viewing numbers, the growth rate isn’t there which suggests a move to original video, and that’s a trend worth noting, especially where budgeting is concerned. The potential for advertisers to reach audiences with ODV is huge, and as ad tech companies develop new ad formats and creative agencies realize the value of enhanced user experience – we’ll likely see a premium on this inventory.

TV isn’t dead, it’s the way we use it that has changed

Remember when the remote control first came about – holy batman did that change our lives for the lazy. Not only did it help nurture the inner couch potato but we could enjoy more variety too – because we were more likely to browse channels. Simple but revolutionary.

As we do with everything, we continue to innovate, improve and make things easier and more varietal for ourselves. The TV is still sitting in the room, it’s just connected to the internet now, and audiences have adopted habits that reflect what they expect of the internet. We have so much choice, and just like ravenous consumers we are, the more choice we have, the more we want.

Whilst laptop/desktop and mobile devices remain the most popular devices for viewing ODV content, connected TV is only marginally behind, and it’s this area which has the biggest impact on a reduction in ‘regular’ TV watching. It’s the business model, not the TV set that needs to adapt now.

Social creatures

It’s not surprising to read in this report that ODV viewers are discovering their content via word of mouth and social media. There is an interesting gender divide in the way content is discovered with females discovering the majority of their content via friends and family, and social media while their male counterparts tend to follow links, recommendations and search results.

All interesting from a marketer’s perspective but it also paints a picture of how much video content is being discovered socially, rather than on a publisher’s own site, and this specific statistical shift should not be swept aside. With many publishers taking advantage of Facebook Instant Articles to publish content, there is a possible threat to bottom line revenues because they too are sharing, but it’s their revenues and their brand identity that are being given away.

When it comes to the cord cutters/cord nevers title – can we just file that in the ‘not another useless piece of jargon bin’? Viewing habits are changing – of course they are, we’re not sat round a huge wooden box with a comparatively small screen choosing from 4 programmes and being told by our mum’s and dad’s to get up and turn it down when the ads come on. No – that doesn’t mean we don’t enjoy viewing together and what the TV has that other devices may not, is the magic of nostalgia.

Modern media offers disparate audiences so much variety, it’s astounding. Content is becoming personal, it’s ubiquitous, but it’s also incredibly niche so even as audiences grow, segments become more identifiable. ODV makes it possible for media companies to present quality, highly engaging and targeted content, and advertisers have the technology at their fingertips to engage through connected devices in a way they never have before – concurrently collecting data about us, learning who we are from our habits.

It shouldn’t come as a shock that viewers like the flexibility of ODV. The fact is, we all have different devices we use daily, often at the same time – and media companies have evolved to give viewers much more choice, control and a completely different way of engaging with content we love. This IAB study shows that significant shift, but did we really need a study? To make it official perhaps yes, but you can also strike up a conversation with any millennial and ask them to explain how they consumed media when they were growing up compared to now.

Millennials drive the habitual change, the next generation takes it even further

Personally, I don’t have TV subscription – I didn’t include it in my ‘broadband bundle option’ because I knew I had other options that suited my household, my budget and my viewing preferences.

It’s little wonder the report found 18-34 year olds are the biggest driver of this significant evolution in the way we view media. What is interesting for brands though is the advertising is reported to be more memorable in this format, contrary to some popular belief. That is just the tip of what’s happening right now under the surface of tech companies who are building the blocks to facilitate much better creative and to change the face of advertisements and our consumer relationship with them. The ads of the very near future will be dynamic, highly personable and definitely more interactive. Millennial audiences have sparked the adoption and growth of connected TV, ODV and amateur video as well but as we too get older and make way for the next generation, the digital model becomes even more user focused. Personal, shareable, highly accessible content packed with options and driven by advertised which itself is informed by real time data is very real, traditional models of media including TV shouldn’t begrudge this change, nor deny it – it should be seen as a real opportunity.

There’s no need to hollow out the old set and put mr goldfish inside – but you may just find the communal ritual of watching tele, becomes more personal, more enjoyable and dare we imagine, more profitable?

 

Posted by simonholliday in Coull comment

Coull Quickie – May 2016

The Coull Quickie for May is here and it’s not good news for publishers as 3 Mobile UK sets to trial Shine’s ad blocking tech at network level. The IAB US reveals some interesting stats around new viewing habits, AppNexus launches free viewabiltiy measurement for its partners and the Guardian launches their own native mobile ad formats. Get all the latest programmatic video advertising news right here, every month.

Watch the Coull Quickie – May 2016 right here, right now:

Posted by simonholliday in Coull video